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Colorado Ballet presents spine-tingling Dracula during Halloween weekend

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Colorado Ballet will present Dracula, October 31-November 2, 2014 at the Ellie Caulkins Opera House.  Dracula features choreography by Michael Pink and music by Philip Feeney, performed live by the Colorado Ballet Orchestra.

 

“Come sink your teeth into this spine-tingling ballet full of seductive vampires, frightening mental patients and the king of the undead himself, Count Dracula,” said Gil Boggs, Colorado Ballet Artistic Director.  “Our audience requests this production over and over again and we cannot wait to perform Dracula during Halloween weekend this year.  This is one of the most popular ballets we perform and because it is for one weekend only, we are expecting full houses for every performance.”

 

Based on Bram Stoker’s Gothic horror, Dracula contains mature content and is not recommended for children ages 13 or younger.

  

“Our production of Dracula is big, with grand sets including a train station, grand hotel, sanatorium, a terrifying underground vault and of course, Count Dracula’s Castle in Transylvania,” said Boggs.  “Audiences will feel like they are part of the action, as if any moment Count Dracula could sneak up behind them in the theater.  People who love the book or any of the other adaptations of this horror classic will love Colorado Ballet’s performance because the story is easy to follow and the dancing and music enhance the passion and terror of this deliciously macabre ballet.”

 

Performance Dates and Times:

Friday, October 31, 2014 @ 7:30 p.m.

Saturday, November 1, 2014 @ 2 p.m.

Saturday, November 1, 2014 @ 7:30 p.m.

Sunday, November 2, 2014 @ 2 p.m.

 

Ticket prices range from $25 to $155. To purchase tickets, visit www.coloradoballet.org or call 303-837-8888 ext. 2.  Dracula is presented by PwC.

 

Colorado Ballet will also host several special events around Dracula including a costume party after the performance on Halloween night and a Bloody Mary Brunch for the Center Stage Young Patrons group before the November 2 performance.  For more information on either of these events, visit www.coloradoballet.org/events.

Artists of Colorado Ballet in "Dracula" by Terry Shapiro

Colorado Ballet to perform under the stars at Arvada Center

Wednesday, July 09, 2014

Colorado Ballet will present An Evening under the Stars at 7:30 p.m. on August 16, 2014 at the Arvada Center Outdoor Amphitheater.

An Evening under the Stars will highlight Colorado Ballet’s 2014-2015 season by featuring previews from several ballets including A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Dracula.  The production will also include other classical and contemporary works.  The evening will close with Sandra Brown’s The Last Beat, with music by DeVotchKa, which premiered at Ballet Director’s Choice in March 2014.

Tickets range from $15 to $39.  Patrons who use promo code BALLET will receive 20 percent off covered seating tickets.  This promotion is for covered seats only, lawn seats are not valid and the promotion expires on August 1.  For more information, visit www.arvadacenter.org.

This performance marks the opening of Colorado Ballet’s 54th season, which includes A Midsummer Night’s Dream September 26-October 5, 2014, Dracula October 31-November 2, 2014, The Nutcracker November 29-December 27, 2014, Ballet MasterWorks February 20-March 1, 2015 and Peter and the Wolf March 27-29, 2015.

Artists of Colorado Ballet in "The Last Beat"
By Sue Daniels Photography

Ballet Director's Choice: Feast of the Gods

Friday, February 28, 2014

On March 28-30 2014, Colorado Ballet will close out its season with Ballet Director’s Choice. This contemporary production will present three entirely different pieces, each with their own unique choreography and music.

Feast of the Gods, choreographed by Edwaard Liang, with music by Italian composer Ottorino Respighi, will be the second of the three-part production. This performance was originally inspired by the history of a band of traveling gypsies.

The darkly powerful choreography created by Edwaard Liang delivers a sense of elegant seduction, modernity and imagination. Unlike your typical tutus and tiaras, Feast of the Gods features very intimate yet sophisticated costumes. Aside from the music and choreography, the brilliant strength displayed by the dancers, the red and black hues of the stage, and the romantic lighting, will ultimately generate a very dynamic and inspiring piece of art, not to mention the passionate and heart-clinching pas de deux.

Liang, who began training at Marin Ballet when he was five, has been internationally known for his rich and lustrous works; his reputation reflects his vision for creativity and his attention for detail. Liang’s mission is to engage the community through quality performance. Liang won the Prince Prize for Choreography and was nominated for the Golden Mask Award in Russia for Best Production.

This work in Ballet Director’s Choice will be danced to a score by Ottorino Respighi, a musician and composer best known for his orchestral music and vivid symphonic poems. Respighi’s music has been influenced by visual experiences and feelings of deep attachment to cherished places. His works have also been inspired by Medieval and Renaissance music.

Click here for more information about Ballet Director's Choice

Sharon Wehner and Jesse Marks in Feast of the Gods, photo by Terry Shapiro

Ballet Director's Choice: Traveling Alone

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Colorado Ballet will close out its season with Ballet Director’s Choice March 28-30 2014. This contemporary production will present three entirely different pieces, each with their own unique choreography and music.

Traveling Alone, choreographed by Amy Seiwert, with music by Max Richter, will be the first of the three. The expressive and courageous performance of Traveling Alone will ultimately signify Amy Seiwert’s emotionally inspiring choreography. As the Artistic Director behind Imagery (a contemporary ballet company in San Francisco), Seiwert believes that ballet is a vital voice to our times. “Imagery is interested in the intersection of genres, and its aesthetic defies classification; Seiwert's artistic direction reflects commitment to create & present work of excellence and influence.” (asimagery.org) The San Francisco Chronicle twice-listed Seiwert’s choreography in the “Top 10” dance events.

In addition to Seiwert’s choreography, the post-classical music of Max Richter will give Traveling Alone an edgy and modern style. Ignoring the boundaries in favor of mysterious and thrillingly beautiful sounds, Richter’s vision has been influenced by a blend of electronic, rock and classical music. Richter’s scores have not only received several awards, but have also been used in various films including the motion pictures Disconnect and Shutter Island.

Traveling Alone is a piece about a woman traveling to some distant land where she interacts with eight others; she’s an outsider, who moves differently, dresses differently, and through dance eventually meets a common ground with the others. Between the modern costumes, vibrant energy on stage, and the breathtaking strength of the dancers, this section of Ballet’s Director’s Choice will deliver an artistic and dramatic world-class ballet.

Click here for more information about Ballet Director's Choice.

Artists of Colorado Ballet in Traveling Alone, photo by Terry Shapiro

CINDERELLA – Comparing and contrasting the 1950 Walt Disney animated classic film VS the 1970 choreographed Ben Stevenson ballet

Friday, January 24, 2014
  1. In both versions, Cinderella’s mother passes away and her father remarries
  2. In Stevenson’s version, the fairy godmother was once a beggar woman who Cinderella had given bread to
  3. In Disney’s version, Cinderella’s mice friends had sewn her a pink dress for the ball before it got destroyed by her evil stepsisters
  4. In Stevenson’s version, the fairy godmother turns Cinderella’s kitchen into a forest, complete with dragonflies, whereas in Disney’s version Cinderella meets her fairy godmother outside under a tree
  5. In both versions, the fairy godmother gives Cinderella a pair of glass slippers and turns her rags into a gown
  6. In both versions, the fairy godmother turns a pumpkin into a magical coach
  7. In Disney’s version, the mice get turned into horses, whereas in Stevenson’s version four lizards are turned into the horses
  8. In both versions, Cinderella leaves behind one of her glass slippers while rushing out of the ball at midnight
  9. In Stevenson’s version, the prince comes to Cinderella’s house to try to find the owner of the glass slipper, and as Cinderella sits down to try it on her second slipper falls out of her pocket, which is when the prince realizes it was her at the ball and asks for her hand in marriage.
  10. In Disney’s version, when Cinderella goes to try on the glass slipper presented only by the Duke, her evil stepmother trips the Duke causing the glass slipper to fall and shatter. Cinderella then pulls the second slipper out of her apron and proves to the Duke that it fits. Cinderella and the mice are then taken by the Duke to the castle where the prince awaits. 
  11. In both versions, Cinderella’s evil stepsisters both try forcing the glass slipper on before Cinderella gets to, proving that their feet were way too big to fit.
  12. In Stevenson’s version, Cinderella ends up forgiving her stepmother and stepsisters for their cruelty to her, whereas Disney’s version doesn’t mention what happens to them after. 
  13. In both versions, Cinderella and the prince live happily ever after!

Colorado Ballet's 53rd Season

Friday, August 16, 2013

Colorado Ballet’s 53rd season will feature classical works including Giselle, The Nutcracker and Cinderella at the Ellie Caulkins Opera House.  The season concludes with Ballet Director’s Choice, which includes three contemporary ballets at the Newman Center for the Performing Arts.

Colorado Ballet opens the season with the hauntingly beautiful classical ballet Giselle, October 4-13, 2013 at the Ellie Caulkins Opera House.  Giselle will take the audience on a journey of love, betrayal, death and forgiveness, with live music performed by the Colorado Ballet Orchestra.

KeyBank presents the holiday classic The Nutcracker, November 30 through December 28, 2013 at the Ellie Caulkins Opera House.  The Nutcracker features unforgettable characters, dazzling costumes, classic choreography and Tchaikovsky's extraordinary arrangement performed live by the Colorado Ballet Orchestra. This dazzling spectacle of glittering snowflakes and shimmering sugarplums will transport audiences to the Land of Sweets.

In the spring, PwC will present the classic fairy tale Cinderella, February 14-23, 2014 at the Ellie Caulkins Opera House. This well-known tale sprinkled with humor that demonstrates dreams can come true, especially with the help of a fairy godmother.  Cinderella features an enchanting score by Prokofiev, performed live by the Colorado Ballet Orchestra.

Colorado Ballet will close out the season with Ballet Director’s Choice, March 28-30, 2014 at Newman Center for the Performing Arts. This production will include Traveling Alone, choreographed by Amy Seiwert; Edwaard Liang’s Feast of the Gods; and a world premiere choreographed by Sandra Brown.

For more information, visit www.coloradoballet.org.

Colorado Ballet to perform under the stars at Arvada Center

Thursday, August 08, 2013
Colorado Ballet will present An Evening under the Stars at 7:30 p.m. on August 29, 2013 at the Arvada Center Outdoor Amphitheater.  

An Evening under the Stars will highlight Colorado Ballet’s 2013-2014 season by featuring previews from several ballets including the Act II Pas de Deux and other excerpts from Giselle as well as selections from Feast of the Gods and Traveling Alone from Ballet Director’s Choice.  The production will also include other classical and contemporary works and the premiere of Piazzola, a new tango piece choreographed by Lorita Travaglia.

Tickets range from $15 to $39.  For more information, visit www.arvadacenter.org.

Light /The Holocaust & Humanity Project

Saturday, March 16, 2013

By Gil Boggs

While sometimes art serves as a distraction for the viewer and helps them to forget their troubles, other times art challenges its audience to think about issues in the wider world.

For this reason, I chose to bring Light /The Holocaust & Humanity Project to Colorado Ballet. Choreographed by Stephen Mills, Artistic Director at Ballet Austin, Light is set in 5 movements and is based on the life of one Holocaust survivor. After 9/11, Mills was inspired to create a ballet with an impact. He interviewed more than a dozen survivors during his 18 months of research before beginning work on Light.

Mills came to Denver in late January to teach his powerful work to the dancers of Colorado Ballet.

Right now the dancers are working to learn and perfect all the dancing in Light. This is a very emotional ballet, for the audience and the performers. The dancers must attempt to put themselves in the shoes of those who were subjugated during the Holocaust. The level of suffering those people endured is hard to understand, let alone to portray through dance.

Many of Colorado Ballet’s performances, like The Nutcracker, bring a temporary halt to the stress of everyday life and transport viewers into another realm for a short time. Other works, like Light, have the power to make the audience share empathy with those different from themselves and to think about what’s going on in the world today.

This ballet promises to have a stirring impact on all those who experience it. People survived and lived on to thrive even after everything they endured. This is the message I hope viewers take away from Light.

www.coloradoballet.org/light

Ballet MasterWorks

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

By Gil Boggs

Stravinsky, Balanchine, and Caniparoli with more dancers on stage and musicians in the pit than you can imagine. Unlike anything we have done before, be prepared to be exhausted when you leave. In other words don’t miss it, you want believe what you see!

The Rite of Spring, composed by Igor Stravinsky, has an almost primitive sound that when paired with the sharp movements and sometimes odd angles of the dancers' motions evokes a powerful response. It's not surprising that when this piece debuted in Paris in 1913 it caused audience outrage. At this point in time, no one had ever heard orchestral music and seen choreography with such raw, wild, unrefined sound and movement.

Even though this year is The Rite of Spring's 100th anniversary, this piece doesn't sound like anything else composed before most people had radios. The primal beat and dissonant chords in the music help the viewer really immerse themselves in the ballet's story of paganism and human sacrifice.

The level athleticism and technical difficulty in the dancing is incredible, the music and choreography are an excellent pair and the minimal costuming will certainly evoke primal feelings.

The dancers and musicians are going to blow you away! Performances Feb. 22-March 3.

Visit www.coloradoballet.org for tickets.

Ballet’s Grand Jetés: From Swan Lake to Petrushka

Thursday, September 27, 2012

By Gil Boggs

The University of Denver will offer a ballet history course this October and it will feature Colorado Ballet Artistic Director Gil Boggs as a guest lecturer on October 11.  This class also includes a ticket to Colorado Ballet's The Sleeping Beauty and Colorado Symphony Orchestra's Petrushka.  Enrollment is open until October 4.

Ballet’s Grand Jetés: From Swan Lake to Petrushka

Originally, ballet wasn’t much more than gaudy entertainment for wealthy Italian dukes. But over the centuries, the music of great composers such as Tchaikovsky and Stravinsky elevated it to an honored—and well-traveled—art form. Enhanced by videos and an in-class visit from Colorado Ballet Artistic Director Gil Boggs, this course led by popular Enrichment instructor Marc Shulgold retraces ballet’s evolution and journey (grand jetés!) across Europe. After its exportation to France in the 1500s, ballet flourished under Louis XIV. His love of dance encouraged court choreographers to add the perfume of French refinement. Though post-revolution Paris became Europe’s dance capital, by the late 1800s ballet had packed its bags again—this time for Russia, where French-born dance-maker Marius Petipa teamed with Tchaikovsky to create masterworks that still captivate the world. (See for yourself when you attend Colorado Ballet’s production of The Sleeping Beauty.) Then, in the early 1900s, a troupe of brilliant Russian dancers and choreographers—including young Igor Stravinsky—left their homeland and brought ballet back to Paris, scandalizing the city with new works that mixed classic beauty with modern eroticism. Conclude this journey of danse with a semi-staged performance of Stravinsky’s Petrushka by the Colorado Symphony Orchestra. Performance tickets included. 10% discount to Ballet and Symphony subscribers.

Format:
Five sessions
Thur., 7–9 pm, Oct. 4, 11, 18, 2012
The Sleeping Beauty, Sat., 7:30 pm, Oct. 13,
Petrushka, Sat., 7:30 pm, Oct. 27,
Denver Performing Arts Complex

CRN 1108 / $205

Instructor:
Marc Shulgold, music journalist, concert lecturer, teacher. After working at the Los Angeles Times for 12 years, Marc became the first—and the last—music and dance writer at The Rocky Mountain News, covering the cultural scene throughout the region for nearly 22 years.

Questions?
Call 303-871-2291 or 1-800-347-2042, or email uc-registration@du.edu.
http://universitycollege.du.edu/enrichment/

PPE 0186 - Music/Dance: Ballet's Jetés

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